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Preserve Ohio's Book Heritage

About the Poster

Acknowledgements
Sources for more Information
Book Guide

The Ohio Preservation Council produced a poster, “Preserve Ohio's Book Heritage”, in honor of the Ohio Bicentennial. The poster celebrates the aesthetic legacy of nineteenth-and early twentieth-century cloth bindings, as well as Ohio authors’ significant contribution to American literature. The volumes pictured have been preserved in their original bindings by OPC member libraries. Each book shown has an historic Ohio connection: it was either published in Ohio or written by an Ohio author.

Acknowledgments

The Ohio Preservation Council gratefully acknowledges assistance from the following individuals:

George Bain – Head of Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries
David Barker – Timeline, Ohio Historical Society
Joan Clark – Head of Main Library, Cleveland Public Library
Chris Duckworth – Timeline, Ohio Historical Society
Geoff Smith – Curator of Rare Books & Manuscripts, Ohio State University Libraries
Renae Waples – Mayhew Peper Photography, Cincinnati, Ohio

The research and location of materials for the bicentennial poster project was performed by a task for of the following OPC members:

Elli Bambakidis – Dayton Metro Library
Wesley Boomgaarden – Ohio State University Libraries
Cara Gilgenbach – Kent State University Libraries and Media Services
Suzanne Haag – Miami University Libraries
Joy Kiser – National Endowment for the Arts
Barbara Meister – Ohioana Library Association
Sylvia Verdun Metzinger – The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County
Sandra Neyman – Marietta College Library
Ann Olszewski – Cleveland Public Library
Ellen Strong – Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve University

Sources of More Information

American Book Covers, 1830-1900 by Sue Allen
An excellent overview of the design history of binding by American publishers can be found in the document American Book Covers, 1830-1900, by Sue Allen. This work, an illustrated guide, was published in 1998 by the Library of Congress, Binding and Collection Care Division of the Preservation Directorate. (SuDocs number LC 1.6/4:AM 3/2).

Decorated Cloth in America Publishers’ Bindings, 1840-1910 by Sue Allen
Studies of early stamped bindings and the later artist-designed bindings are included in Decorated Cloth in America Publishers’ Bindings, 1840-1910; , by Sue Allen and Charles Gullans. This beautifully illustrated book was published in 1994 by the UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library.

Judging a Book by its Cover – Online Exhibit
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/eresources/exhibitions/gilded/index.html
The Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library presented an exhibit, Judging a Book by Its Cover: Gold-Stamped Publishers’ Bindings of the 19th Century from November 1997 to February 1998. The exhibit was curated by Claudia Funke and Jane Rodgers Siegel.

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Guide to the Books

The World by H.L Smith
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Senator’s Son by Metta Victoria Fuller Victor
Seneca’s Morals by Lucius Annaeus Seneca
New Elementary Algebra by Joseph Ray
Venetian Life by William Dean Howells
Illustrated Cincinnati by Daniel J. Kenny
A Memorial of Alice and Phoebe Cary by Mary Clemmer
Our Western Border by Charles McKnight
Drifting by Thomas Buchanan Read
A Book of the Black Bass (1881) by James Alexander Henshall, MD
Clovernook by Alice Cary
Tuscan Cities by William Dean Howells
Songs in the Night by Ben Roy Shaw
To and From, Up and Down by Emma H. Adams
Clover by Susan Coolidge
Their Canoe Trip by Mary P. Wells Smith
The Story of My Life by Benjamin W. Chidlaw
The Poetical Works of Alice and Phoebe Cary
Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan by Lafcadio Hearn
Their Wedding Journey by William Dean Howells
Gleanings in Buddha Fields by Lafcadio Hearn
The Wife of His Youth by Charles W. Chesnutt
The Conjure Woman by Charles W. Chesnutt
Shadowings by Lafcadio Hearn
Book of the Black Bass (1900) by James Alexander Henshall, MD
Two Girls by Susan Coolidge
The House Behind the Cedars by Charles W. Chesnutt
When Malindy Sings by Paul Laurence Dunbar
The Sky Blue by Olin J. Ross
Howdy, Honey, Howdy by Paul Laurence Dunbar
Old Home Week by J. B. Naylor

Order the Poster

 

The World by H.L Smith

Smith, H. L. (Hamilton Lanphere), 1819-1903. The World: Or, First Lessons in Astronomy and Geology, in Connection with the Present and Past Condition of our Globe...; Cleveland, M. C. Younglove and Company : 1848.

Cleveland Public Library, Special Collections.

Hamilton Lanphere Smith relocated from Connecticut to Cleveland with his parents and siblings in 1837. Then seventeen, he had already completed one year at Yale College where he had constructed the largest Herschelian telescope in the country. Smith wrote The World, one of the first science textbooks written in America, in 1848, and it was used extensively both in this country and in Europe. Smith taught Natural Philosophy at Kenyon College in Ohio then finished his career at Hobart College in New York. He became known worldwide for inventing the tintype camera process, which popularized photography in America, and for creating a system for describing microscopic algae that is still in use today.

This binding is an example of a style introduced in the 1830’s. Bound in brown cloth, it features a central vignette, stamped in gold, and a decorative blind stamped border (stamped without gold or other colored ink). There is no lettering on the front cover.

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Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896. Uncle Tom’s Cabin: Or, Life Among the Lowly. Boston, J.P. Jewett Co.; Cleveland, Jewett, Proctor, and Worthington : 1853.

Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Rare Books and Special Collections.

This book first brought the problems of American slavery to the attention of the world. Perhaps no other work of fiction has ever been so influential in shaping the destiny of a nation. The author moved to Cincinnati with her family at the age of 21. Her father was the head of the Lane Theological Seminary, and her older sister Catherine opened the Western Female Institute where Harriet became a teacher. She met and married her husband, Calvin Ellis Stowe, in Cincinnati. Conceived as a novel of social protest, Uncle Tom's Cabin was written over a forty-week period, and printed in weekly installments in the National Era, an anti-slavery newspaper published in Washington. Dr. Gamaliel Bailey, its publisher, had known the Stowes when he lived in Cincinnati. The book was offered to another publisher who turned it down before Mrs. Stowe signed a contract with Jewett and Company, a small Boston publishing firm. The first edition of 5,000 copies was published March 20, 1852. Three thousand copies sold on that first day. In the first five months of publication, 100,000 copies were sold. The record- breaking sales total for the first year was 300,000 copies. Additional printers and binders were needed to try to meet the demand for the book.

The first edition was published in two volumes, bound in brown cloth. The gold stamped central vignette on the cover replicates the illustration from the title page. There is no lettering on the front cover.

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The Senator’s Son by Metta Victoria Fuller Victor

Victor, Metta Victoria Fuller, 1831-1885. The Senator’s Son, or the Main Law: A Last Refuge: A Story Dedicated to the Law-makers, Cleveland, Ohio: Tooker and Gatchel, 1853.

Ohioana Library Association

The Senator’s Son is a temperance novel that received only modest attention, though it was released in both American and English editions. The prolific Victor grew up in Wooster, Ohio and was a published author by the age of fifteen whose writing ranged from poetry to dime novels. She was the first American woman to publish detective fiction, and is credited as the first author to have used the literary device of placing all one’s murder suspects in the same room.

The cover of The Senator’s Son, with the use of a generalized vignette and blind stamping (stamping without gold or other colored ink) carries forth book design elements from the 1830s. There is no lettering on the front cover.

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Seneca’s Moralsby Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Seneca, Lucius Annaeus (ca. 4 B.C.-65 A.D.). Seneca’s Morals : By way of Abstract by Roger L’Estrange, Rev. Ed. by Lucius V. Bierce. Cleveland, Ohio : A.B. Co., 1855.

Cleveland Public Library, Special Collections.

Lucius Verus Bierce, 1801-1876, the editor of this volume, served as Mayor of Akron in 1839, 1841, 1844, 1849, and 1867. He was an opponent of slavery, a supporter of John Brown, the Uncle of Ambrose Bierce, and the author of Historical Reminiscences of Summit County, published in Akron, 1854.

This cover, with a circular gold stamped vignette of hands and a blind stamped border of leaves, retains a style of the previous decade, with the addition of a decorative lettered title stamped in gold.

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New Elementary Algebra by Joseph Ray

Ray, Joseph, 1807-1855 New Elementary Algebra : Primary Elements of Algebra, for Common Schools and Academies. Rev. Electrotype Ed Cincinnati ; New York : Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., c1866.

Ohio University Library, Special Collections.

Ray taught high school in Cincinnati (Woodward) from 1831-51 and then served as principal until his death. He wrote several arithmetic and algebra textbooks that were very widely used, and that were still being printed in 1905. Ray’s works may have been as popular in his subject as the McGuffey readers.

This utilitarian, pedagogical work is stamped completely in black, with no gold, although the scrolls and flourishes reflect a style of ornament often used with gold stamping in the 1870’s. This type of black ornamentation was inspired by the architectural designs of Charles Eastlake.

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Venetian Life by William Dean Howells

Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920. Venetian Life, Boston: J. R. Osgood and Co., 1872 . 1874 printing.

Ohioana Library Association.

While working as an editorial writer for The Ohio State Journal, Howells was asked to write a biography of President Lincoln. Though he took up the task with little enthusiasm, and the resulting book was lack-luster, President Lincoln subsequently assigned the Martin’s Ferry, Ohio native a consul post in Venice. His duties in Venice were light enough to allow the young author time to write Venetian Life and Italian Journeys.

The binding is typical of the circa 1870’s book covers that introduced black ink and asymmetric designs. The publisher repeated this design, altering only the vignettes, type font, and cloth color, for subsequent titles by Howells.

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Illustrated Cincinnati by Daniel J. Kenny

Kenny, Daniel J. Illustrated Cincinnati: A Pictorial Hand-Book of the Queen City, Comprising Its Architecture, Manufacture, Trade; Its Social, Literary, Scientific, and Charitable Institutions; Its Churches, Schools and Colleges; and All Other Principal Points of Interest to the Visitor and Resident, Together With an Account of the Most Attractive Suburbs, Publisher: Cincinnati, R. Clarke, 1875.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Rare Books and Special Collections.

This pictorial work included over three hundred and twenty engravings and a new and complete map.

The Cincinnati publisher followed a style used by eastern publishers in the 1870’s, with black Eastlake type ornamentation and gold stamping. There is no central, pictorial stamp; the decorative lettering has itself become the central vignette. The same black design was used on the back, with an advertisement in black letters replacing the decorative gold lettering of the front.

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A Memorial of Alice and Phoebe Cary by Mary Clemmer

Clemmer, Mary, 1839-1884. A Memorial of Alice and Phoebe Cary: With Some of Their Later Poems, New York: Hurd and Houghton, 1876, c1873.

Ohioana Library Association.

From a humble Ohio farm near Cincinnati to the salon of their popular New York residence, the Cary sisters were nearly inseparable, and died within six months of one another. At the request of their brothers, Clemmer composed this memorial to the beloved sister poets. In a story told from personal knowledge and remembrance interwoven with intimations from long-time friends, the author attempts to trace “two lives, so delicately and variously tinted ... so finely veined with a many-shaded deep humanity.”

Black ink coupled with a sense of asymmetry is seen in color choice and placement of the flourishes that frame the book’s title on this cover. In the 1870s “beveled” edges were beginning to be applied to the boards.

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Our Western Border by Charles McKnight

McKnight, Charles, 1826-1881. Our Western Border: Its Life, Combats, Adventures, Forays, Massacres, Captivities, Scouts, Red Chiefs, Pioneer Women, One Hundred Years Ago ..., Philadelphia: J. C. McCurdy, 1876.

Ohioana Library Association.

The elaborately detailed design of this book “about Ohio” crowds the cover to the edges, relies heavily on the strength of black ink, and employs the “beveled-edge” boards common to the era.

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Drifting by Thomas Buchanan Read

Read, Thomas Buchanan, 1822-1872. Drifting; Illustrated From Designs by Miss L. B. Humphrey, Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1881.

Ohioana Library Association.

A native of Pennsylvania, Read moved to Ohio as a young man of seventeen to study fine art. While he was only in Ohio for three years, scenes of a voyage on the Ohio River figure in his later poetry.

In the 1850s silver stamping was abandoned because of problems associated with tarnishing. This book’s cover is a striking example of the use of a substitute material to simulate the color silver.

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A Book of the Black Bass (1881) by James Alexander Henshall, MD

Henshall, James Alexander MD, 1836-1925. A Book of the Black Bass, Comprising its Complete Scientific and Life History, Together With a Practical Treatise on Angling and Fly Fishing and a Full Description of Tools, Tackle and Implements. Cincinnati, R. Clarke & Co., c 1881.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County Rare Books and Special Collections

Dr. Henshall, physician and fishing enthusiast, was a prolific writer and early conservation advocate. He wrote the first book on the black bass, and was recognized as an authority on all American fishes. The publisher, Henshall’s friend Robert Clarke, was one of the last of the large Cincinnati publishers. From 1888-1892, Henshall was secretary and then president of the Ohio Fish Commission. He was secretary of the Cincinnati Society of Natural History, and co-editor of its monthly journal.

The simple design of a fish stamped in gold with a blind stamped border recalls the style of the 1830’s and 1840’s. The spine holds a magnificent gold stamped image of the fisherman (thought to be the author), casting his rod. The book was reprinted many times. See the 1900 edition [link to book 26] for a very different cover.

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Clovernook by Alice Cary

Cary, Alice , 1820-1871. Clovernook, or, Recollections of our Neighborhood in the West. New York: J.W. Lovell Co. 1884.

Miami University Libraries.

Alice Cary, author of Clovernook (first published in 1852), represented here in an 1884 edition, was a woman whose life represents those in any age struggling to break through the constraints of their culture. Alice Cary was born in Mt. Healthy, Ohio, (now a suburb of Cincinnati), into a hard pioneer life. She received almost no formal education and no ready-made support system, but went on to become a completely independent professional literary writer. This book illustrates, among other things, not only Cary’s ability to develop the nascent medium of the brief sketch but also reveals her belief in the importance of developing an American literature through the introduction of realistic regionalism.

The author’s last name was misspelled “Carey” on the cover in this edition and in the first 1852 edition. Cary wrote two volumes of Clovernook stories; the second series was first published in 1853. The original 1852 edition was published in a plain brown cloth cover with only a simple blind stamped border on the front, but with decorative gold stamping on the spine. The “new” 1884 edition is fully stamped and considerably more elaborate. Lettering from the title page of the first edition is reproduced in gold, with images from the stories stamped in black ink.

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Tuscan Cities by William Dean Howells

Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920. Tuscan Cities; With Illustrations From Drawings and Etchings by Joseph Pennell and Others, Boston: Ticknor and Co., 1886.

Ohioana Library Association.

Tuscan Cities is an enchanting account of north central Italian locales including Florence, Pisa, and Siena. Architectural renovation is covered with subtle humor, as Howells describes the restoration of Dante’s house as a “nineteenth-century medievalism.”

The treatment received by this cover leans progressively forward in its use of ungrained cloth and flat graphics as opposed to textured cloths and embossed designs, yet still reflects the, then current, practice of crowding the display field with design elements.

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Songs in the Night by Ben Roy Shaw

Shaw, Ben Roy (1827?-1900). Songs in the Night. Wooster, Ohio, Clapper’s Steam Printing House, 1887.

Kent State University Libraries.

Born in Canada, Ben Roy Shaw lived in Wooster for a number of years. This book is housed in the Special Collections and Archives department of the Kent State University Libraries. It is part of the general collection of works by Ohio and regional authors collected by the department. Special Collections and Archives also owns a copy of Shaw’s Poems (Seville, Ohio: W.E. Coulter, 1874).

The binding incorporates an old-fashioned central gold stamped vignette with a decorative border stamped in black.

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To and From, Up and Down by Emma H. Adams

Adams, Emma H. (Emma Hildreth), 1827-c.1900. To and From, Up and Down in Southern California, Oregon, and Washington Territory With Sketches in Arizona, New Mexico and British Columbia. Cincinnati: Cranston Stowe, c1888.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Rare Books and Special Collections.

The author lived for a time in Cleveland, and her husband was from Columbus. Her early books were published in Cincinnati.

This travel work is embellished with a full, pictorial cover design stamped in gold, silver and black.

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Clover by Susan Coolidge

Coolidge, Susan, [pseud.], 1835-1905. Clover. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1889.

Cleveland Public Library, Special Collections.

Sarah Chauncey Woolsey, born in Cleveland, published over thirty juvenile books between 1872 and 1906 under the Coolidge pen name. She began writing for periodicals in 1871. Her most popular works were a five-volume series for girls, What Katy Did, published from 1873 to 1891. Clover is the fourth volume of the “Katy” series, and centers on Katy’s sister, Clover. The fictional Carr family was modeled after the author’s own, with Katy Carr inspired by Susan (Sarah) herself, and the brothers and sisters modeled on Coolidge’s Woolsey siblings. In addition to her children’s books, Sarah Woolsey edited the correspondence of Fanny Burney and Jane Austen, and published several volumes of poetry.

The delicate, gold-stamped design of this volume was designed by Boston artist Sarah Wyman Whitman, who also designed covers for Coolidge’s poetry collections. Whitman was one of the first professionally trained artists to design book covers for a major publisher. She rebelled against the ornate, highly embellished look of the Victoria era, craftsman-designed binding. With her simplified designs, she applied a touch of elegant art to the cheaply manufactured book. For Clover she created a design of cloverleaf and flower, joined to the title by graceful golden circles. The lettering is her own distinctive, sans serif alphabet.

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Their Canoe Trip by Mary P. Wells Smith

Smith, Mary P. Wells (Mary Prudence Wells), 1840-1930. Their Canoe Trip. Boston : Little, Brown, c1889.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Rare Books and Special Collections.

The author was a woman of many achievements. She graduated from the Hartford female seminary in 1859, taught in Greenville Massachusetts from 1859-61, and in 1864-72, and was a clerk in Franklin savings institution, the first woman to work in a bank in Massachusetts. She was secretary of the Greenville Freedmen’s Aid Society in 1865-6, and school commissioner in 1874. She became an Ohioan by marriage to Judge Fayette Smith, of Cincinnati in 1875. In Cincinnati she was president of the local branch of the Woman’s Auxiliary Conference of the Unitarian church. She wrote for magazines under the pen name of “P. Thorne.” Her works for children included the Young Puritans Series.

The cover, stamped in gold and black, features a pictorial design and casual lettering that may reflect the work of an artist designer.

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The Story of My Life by Benjamin W. Chidlaw

Chidlaw, Benjamin W. The Story of My Life. Cincinnati : Robert Clarke Co., Sutton Co., 1890.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Rare Books and Special Collections.

The Reverend Chidlaw, born in Wales, moved with his family to Delaware County, Ohio in 1821. His early education in a log school led eventually to Miami University, where he graduated in 1833. He preached, taught, and organized Sunday Schools in a long affiliation with the American Sunday School Union in Cincinnati. During the Civil War, Chidlaw served as Chaplain of the 39th Regiment of Ohio Volunteers Infantry. In 1866 he became commissioner of the Ohio Reform Farm School, which cared for 500 boys. This autobiography includes a notable description of his early days in Ohio.

The bright red cover, stamped in black and gold, overflows with decorative components. Its embellishments includes patterned borders, a central band of wallpaper-like floral design, a vignette of a church inset at the lower right hand corner with its own black border, and ornate gold letters sprouting scrolls and curlicues. The book was also issued in dark brown cloth stamped in black and gold.

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The Poetical Works of Alice and Phoebe Cary

Cary, Alice, 1820-1871, and Cary, Phoebe, 1824-1871. The Poetical Works of Alice and Phoebe Cary. Boston, New York, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1891.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County,
Rare Books and Special Collections

The poetry of the Cary sisters remained popular twenty years after their deaths, when this black and gold stamped volume was published. The tapestry-like design of the cover consists of two vertical bands of decorative pattern, one patterned in black motifs, and one in gold. Above the bands, the artistically-lettered title sits over a thin horizontal gold line.

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Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan by Lafcadio Hearn

Hearn, Lafcadio, 1850-1904. Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company; Cambridge: The Riverside Press, 1894.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County,
Rare Books and Special Collections.

Lafcadio Hearn worked for the Cincinnati Enquirer and the Cincinnati Commercial from 1872-1877. He traveled as a journalist, seeking an escape from Western materialism. In 1890, he settled in Japan, where he became a Japanese citizen and married a Japanese wife. Taking the name Yakumo Koizumi, he taught English and wrote about his new country.

The elegant binding for Hearn’s first book about Japan was planned by the eminent Boston artist, Sarah Wyman Whitman. Whitman created a stylized but simple lettering as part of the decorative bamboo design stamped in silver on black cloth.

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Their Wedding Journey by William Dean Howells

Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920. Their Wedding Journey. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1895.

This title, first published in 1884, was issued later with a characteristically subtle and elegant cover designed by the artist Sarah Wyman Whitman.

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Gleanings in Buddha Fields by Lafcadio Hearn

Hearn, Lafcadio, 1850-1904. Gleanings in Buddha Fields; Studies of Hand and Soul in the Far East. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company; Cambridge: The Riverside Press, 1897.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County,
Rare Books and Special Collections.

Hearn shared his love of Japanese life and culture with the West through his writings. This is a book of essays and sketches, Hearn’s third title about Japan.

The simple but exquisite gold-stamped binding on blue cloth was designed by Sarah Wyman Whitman.

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The Wife of His Youth by Charles W. Chesnutt

Chesnutt, Charles W[addell], 1858-1932. The Wife of His Youth, and Other Stories of the Color Line. Houghton, Mifflin and company, Boston and New York, 1899.

Cleveland Public Library

A Cleveland native, Chesnutt moved to the South with his family as a child, where by age sixteen he became a teacher, and by nineteen was made assistant principal of the New Fayetteville State Normal School. In 1883, he moved to New York to work as a reporter, and later as a columnist. By 1887 he had returned to Cleveland, where he studied law and was admitted to the Ohio bar. The same year, the Atlantic Monthly published his early “conjure” stories. He served as a court reporter to support his family and writing.

This collection of short stories, published the same year as The Conjure Woman, received a favorable critical response. It was a significant achievement to have the work of an African-American succeed with a prestigious, white, Boston publisher.
The initials of the artist-designer, “BWT,” can be seen amid the graceful swirls stamped in red on a rose pink cloth cover. The ornamentation on this notable binding recalls a traditional Celtic knot design. Distinctive, gold-stamped lettering completes the elegant design.

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The Conjure Woman by Charles W. Chesnutt

Chesnutt, Charles W[addell], 1858-1932. The Conjure Woman, Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1899.

Ohioana Library Association.

This title is the first book of stories by the first nationally recognized African-American novelist. Aunt Peggy is the “conjurer” depicted in these tales of American slavery. Published in March 1899, this collection of stories was at the head of the bestseller list in Cleveland within the first months of its release.

The sophisticated design of this binding features white, red, black, and gold stamping over brown cloth. A horizontal band across the top of the cover is formed by three blocks, each with a single figure over a brilliant red background. The rabbit and the old man pictured in these blocks reflect the folk-like quality of the stories. The title and the author’s name are simply, but elegantly, lettered in gold. The brown of the bookcloth gives color to the old man’s face.

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Shadowings by Lafcadio Hearn

Hearn, Lafcadio, 1850-1904. Shadowings. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1900.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

This collection of tales and essays on Japanese subjects was issued by Hearn’s new publisher, with a spectacular poster-style front cover in white, black and gold. Whereas Sarah Wyman Whitman’s designs were inspired by traditional bookbinding ornamentation, the work of the artist-designer of Shadowings is more dramatic and pictorial.

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Book of the Black Bass (1900) by James Alexander Henshall, MD

Henshall, James Alexander MD, 1836-1925. Book of the Black Bass, Comprising Its Complete Scientific and Life History, Together With a Practical Treatise on Angling and Fly Fishing and a Full Description of Tools, Tackle and Implements. Cincinnati, Robert Clarke, 1900.

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

Henshall was affectionately regarded as the father of American bass fishing. Honorary National President of the Izaak Walton League of America, he was recognized for his work conserving “wild places and wild things for the boys and girls to come.” As pollution editor for the League’s journal, Outdoor America, he waged an heroic battle for the preservation of America’s inland and coastal waters.

The golden fish stamp from the original 1881 edition was reused in a different setting. The title and a quote are printed in black ink on the pale green cloth cover. The spine of this edition is decorated with crossed fishhooks over the title and a rod and reel under the title.

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Two Girls by Susan Coolidge

Coolidge, Susan, [pseud.], 1835-1905. Two Girls, Boston: Little Brown and Co., 1900.

Ohioana Library Association.

This title was published late in the author’s career, after the last of the Katy books, and five years before her death.

The bold swath of background orange, in perfect contrast with the line drawing of one of the girls suggests the work of a skilled designer.

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The House Behind the Cedars by Charles W. Chesnutt

Chesnutt, Charles W[addell], 1858-1932. The House Behind the Cedars. Boston: Houghton. Mifflin and company, 1900.

Ohioana Library Association.

This volume was the author’s first published novel. The success of his first two volumes with Houghton Mifflin paved the way for the book he had been writing and revising for ten years. The story draws on Chesnutt’s personal family history, exploring and exposing socio-cultural aspects of race and intermarriage in the American South.

The artistic cover design is stamped in black and silver on green cloth. The black cedar trees are set against a silver horizon. The green of the bookcloth gives color to the outlined hills. The volume shown on the poster has suffered some losses in the silver area.

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When Malindy Sings by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Dunbar, Paul Laurence, 1872-1906. When Malindy Sings. Illustrated With Photographs by the Hampton Institute Camera Club; Decorations by Margaret Armstrong, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1903.

Ohioana Library Association.

One of Dunbar’s most popular collections, When Malindy Sings was a tribute to his mother’s singing. The opening line tells Miss Lucy, a white woman with the benefit of education, to put away the music book since no amount of practice will equal her voice to Malindy’s, whose rises in “rants and rings” from the kitchen.

The Art Nouveau inspired cover by Margaret Armstrong is initialed in the upper right corner.

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The Sky Blue by Olin J. Ross

Ross, Olin J(Olin Jones) b. 1858. The Sky Blue: A Tale of the Iron Horse and of the Coming Civilization. Columbus, Ohio, The Author, 1904 [c1903].

Ohio State University Libraries.

This title is a self-published book with the printing done by a local Columbus jobber. The author, J. Ross, uses the fiction genre to expostulate about social and political theory and the importance of technology, particularly railroads, as a sanative influence on human affairs. He really is enamored of railroads and sees the linking of important cities as making all the US and world as one “neighborhood,” a concept that guides his thoughts: an early global theorist. Of course, in envisioning what would be good for the future, he also talks much about what is wrong with the current world. The Ohio State University copy pictured on the poster holds this inscription: “Ross was practicing law at the Hillsboro O. Bar from 1884 to 1887 while I was a member of said bar. He was a temperance fanatic and generally eccentric to such a degree, as to be designated a ‘crank’ and this book does not cause one to desire to change the appellation. C.”

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Howdy, Honey, Howdy by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Dunbar, Paul Laurence, 1872-1906. Howdy, Honey, Howdy; Illustrated With Photographs by Leigh Richmond Miner; Decoration by Will Jenkins, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1905.

Ohioana Library Association.

The decorative cloth binding of Dunbar’s ninth book of poetry is stamped in black, gray, orange, and gold, and inset with a sepia-tone photograph of a woman in a doorway. Small photographs framed in ornamental borders accompany each poem.

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Old Home Week by J. B. Naylor

Naylor, J. B. (James Ball) 1860-1945. Old Home Week, Boston, The C. M. Clark Pub. Co. [1906].

Ohioana Library Association.

This small volume with gilt edges was designed by F. Gilbert Edge. It hearkens back to the early central vignette and gold border format, modernized with red, green and white in addition to the gold. The design is a large vignette of a house door, flanked with pillars and a balustrade supporting red climbing roses. The title and author’s name are gold stamped, with a gold stamped plain border.

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